water

Free Energy: Part 3 of 3 - Hydration and nutrition

Hi there, friend.  Are you ready for part three of how to infuse some free energy into your day?  I saved the best for last: hydration and nutrition. Most of us start our day with some combination of getting woken up by kids, feeding the kids, feeding the dog, feeding yourself, getting everyone brushed, changed, and out the door for whatever activity is planned for the day.  So I totally get that mornings are busy. But let me ask you this. Do you have an extra two minutes? And extra two minutes to chug, yes chug, some lovely room temperature water upon waking up. Maybe you have a cute water bottle on your night stand or maybe you have a cup waiting for you in the bathroom.  Or maybe you just fill up your water bottle right away in the morning while the kids are eating breakfast. I don’t care how you get it, but just make sure you’re drinking up first thing in the morning.  

Photography Credit: Leslie Plesser of  https://www.shuttersmack.com/

Photography Credit: Leslie Plesser of https://www.shuttersmack.com/

Why is this so important?  Because our cell tissues and organs are all operating in a water medium.  And our energy is made in our cells. So if we don’t have enough water circulating throughout our bodies, the more that we start feeling symptoms of fatigue.  So I want you to try something tomorrow morning.  Go about your normal morning routine, but instead of making your first beverage a coffee, juice, or milk, try to get down 16 ounces of water right from the get go.  And try to get a total of 16 ounces in before you’re out the door. Sip, chug, guzzle, slurp, whatever. Just get it in.  

Within mere minutes that water becomes your blood, which is 90% water BTW, and your extra cellular fluid, and it pushes out the used fluid that was littered with metabolic waste.  And if you don't drink enough water, that stuff stays gummed up in your system, and results in making you feel sluggish. Water is also what is used to transfer oxygen and nutrients throughout your body, which in turn, gives you energy.  So you aren’t even reaping the benefits of that beautiful salad that you ate for dinner last night if you aren’t drinking enough water to spread it throughout your system. 

But Liz, I’ve tried 100 times to drink more water and it never works!  Yeah, I know. I was there once too. My best advice is to focus on one thing at a time when it comes to your health.  If you try to do all the things at once, none of them will get done. So check your ical and find a week or two where you can commit to implementing one or all of these hydration strategies.

  1. Pair drinking water with one of your other non-negotiable morning tasks.  So for instance, drink your water after you brush your teeth, get dressed for the day, or once you sit down in  your car.  

  2. Buy a fancy water bottle.  I’m not kidding. This actually helps.  If you invest in something that looks pretty and makes you feel even the tiniest bit special, you’re more likely to use it.

  3. Log your water.  Write it down, put it in your phone, email it to yourself, whatever.  But just hold yourself accountable to that 16 ounces of water in the morning.  And once that becomes routine, add another eight ounces at some point in the day until you’re at about half of your ounces 


Now that we’ve covered water, I’m quickly going to run through some foods that can aid in our ability to fall asleep and stay asleep in order to be our best selves in the morning.


Omega3

Not only are Omega-3’s great for brain development function, inflammation reduction, they can help you to get a deeper, more restful sleep. So sources of omega-3 include chia seeds, pumpkin seeds, hemp seeds, walnuts, halibut, salmon, flax seeds.  


Vitamin C

September is right around the corner, which means the back to school cold is also right around the corner.  So I’m sure that you’ll be popping those little vitamin C tablets for candy in the coming weeks. Not only is vitamin C good for our immune system, but it also helps you stay asleep at night.  Some foods high in vitamin C are bell peppers, green leafy vegetables, kiwi, strawberry, citrus fruits, and papaya. 


Magnesium 

This is one micronutrient that we don’t hear much about.  But interestingly enough, for most, this is the mineral that we’re the most deficient in.  And it impacts so many important functions in our body, which in turn impact our sleep; regulating blood pressure, maintains normal cortisol levels, boosts and supports the production of serotonin, and last but not least, it helps to convert food into energy.  Any food with a green hue to it is probably going to have a nice source of magnesium: spinach, chard, also there's pumpkin seeds, almonds, superfoods like spirulina is a great source as well. And since you’re supposed to get 4-5 servings in order to get the recommended amount of magnesium, a supplement might be a more attainable way to go.   


Now obviously what I’ve covered here is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of what impacts our energy levels. And I know how overwhelming it can be to read countless ways to better yourself. So do yourself a favor and just focus on one of the energy infusing actions that I laid out in this series, build it into your routine, and see what feels good.  Once you’ve mastered your first goal, move on to the next challenge. And if you need help building a roadmap for yourself, I’m happy to help.